Patient preferences in devices for self-reporting outcomes in clinical trials

Research groups in Geneva and Boston surveyed 103 subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) about their preferences for using different types of electronic devices in clinical trials, including computers, internet and smartphones.

Electronic patient-reported outcomes (ePROs) are becoming critical for assessing various stages of clinical trials. Research groups in Geneva and Boston surveyed 103 subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) about their preferences for using different types of electronic devices in clinical trials, including computers, internet and smartphones. In addition, they determined a specific timeline that each patient preferred for ePRO measurements. It was also found that the majority of the surveyed patients would find it helpful to have an audible alarm to remind them to record their symptoms.

From the report: ‘Patient engagement and adherence are critical to the success of clinical trials...Trial sponsors should consider patient preferences for specific technology features to reduce patient burden and improve engagement and adherence when using ePRO assessments’.

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